Archive for shameless

Interview with Innerflight: J-Sun Talks Techno to Tokyo

Posted in Artists, Interviews with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 14, 2009 by worldromper

J-Sun NiceJason Zucker, otherwise known as J-Sun, is the founder of Innerflight Music, one of Seattle’s premier record labels and party makers. He just returned from a nine-month trip around the world from Thailand to France and many points in-between.

Here he shares his impressions of the international electronic music community and Seattle’s special place in it, electro in Nepal and disco in Laos, gigging in Tokyo and Istanbul, the sound of flat palm on fat booty, novaTRON’s home planet, Kadeejah’s hair, upcoming releases for Innerflight and the label’s Decibel Festival showcase and of course, the basic human right of an underground party.

You can find music from the amazing Innerflight roster on Beatport; just released today is the remix album of m.0’s “Lift Us Up” EP featuring remix work from Spektre, Mynus and Nerd Revolt. From deep tech house to experimental neo-tribalism, glitchy funk to magnetic progressive, this album is an excellent manifestation of the beautiful variety of the Innerflight sound. Listen to and buy it here.

**********************

First of all, you are answering these questions from the other side of the world. How have your recent travels affected your perception of electronic music culture both abroad and at home?

Ko Chang, Thailand

Ko Chang, Thailand

Being abroad has reminded me that electronica continues to be more popular and commercialized in the rest of the world than in the States. You just don’t get dance muzak playing over the loud speaker in the grocery stores back home. Even the “underground” parties in cities like Berlin can still be large events with long lines to get in. At the same time, there is something incredible about being at a techno party with a hundred thousand people. Stateside, things are just not on that level. It’s much more subdued. The industry is not as big, but the vibe is often better because of that. The ideal is to have both the hype and the underground vibe, but this is a difficult balance to maintain. I wasn’t expecting it, but being abroad made me appreciate Seattle and the West Coast music scene a lot more.

Where have you heard the best music? What global trends have you noticed in EDM? Will your travels affect what you play when you return home?

Disco in Laos

Disco in Laos

Laos had some great music. The disco there is epic! As everyone knows, electro has become the biggest thing in electronica, but I didn’t grasp just how popular it has become until I was in Nepal, trekking 12,000 feet above sea level. In a small village, I heard electro tunes pumping out of a kid’s cell phone. Some of his friends were huddled around the phone with him listening to this bangin’ tune. These people didn’t even have running water, but they had electro!

Myanmar

Myanmar

I’m definitely bringing back some influence of international sounds with me. I love combining organic sounds & techy beats when I deejay and a lot of traditional world music can be perfect for this mixture of the natural and synthetic worlds.

Is there truly an “international electronic music community” and have you found it? Have you played out any, and if so, what did you play?

There are pockets of an international music community in almost every country. On a commercial level, festivals like Sonar, WMC, Mutek, and Decibel Festival represent the electronica slice of the greater international community. Every local area has it’s own unique musical tastes and culture, but there are universals that seem to run through all music scenes in the world.

Tokyo

Tokyo

For music, I loved Tokyo, Saigon, and Istanbul. Then again, those were some of the places I gigged in and that always has a big influence on your impression of a place. People were really feeling the house music in the places I performed at. There were moments, actually most of the times I played, when I would attempt to play more techno and electro, but the crowds were feeling the funk. Maybe people in other countries expect that from U.S. DJs.

My impromptu gigs in Laos were a lot of fun because I was able to play whatever I wanted, no expectations. Laos’s people are amazingly friendly and they really know how to enjoy themselves. They love good beats and they love to dance.

Have you discovered any new genres or styles that you will bring home to Seattle? What seems to be the most popular electronic music out there? Can anything uproot the global popularity of trance? And trance: Why?

J-Sun in Saigon

J-Sun in Saigon

In Southeast Asia, nothing exciting was really going on in terms of new music, so I got into the traditional sounds of these cultures. In Vietnam, they have a stringed instrument called the (Bon Bow), and it makes a beautiful pitch bend sound from bending the notes on the string. Long ago, young women were not allowed to listen to the sounds of this instrument for fear that they would fall in love with the man who was playing.  I’m excited to hear more beats coming out of the developing countries because there are so many incredible traditional sounds that could be represented. At the beginning of the trip, I played on Ko Chang in Thailand. It was a total reality check for me. I was expecting to drop some techy West Coast funk but the requests for trance from Europeans on holiday were relentless. Some people were shouting at me to speed the music up to 140 BPMs. Luckily I had some solid progressive tunes with me to appease the masses, but I absolutely refuse to play music that fast.

A Tokyo dance floor

A Tokyo dance floor

It’s hard to believe, but it seems like electro has knocked trance out of the top spot for global electronica popularity. I’m not sure if this is good or bad though because now electro is what’s hip to hate on.

Trance is like fly paper…Why trance? Why Pachinko? Why do people eat dogs? Why florescent lighting? Why does the entire continent of Europe all go on vacation at the same time? You just can’t ponder these questions or you’ll drive yourself mad.

What is the concept behind Innerflight and where did it come from?

LOGO-InnerflightBanner_100x100Innerflight is about the journey within. The internal struggle that everyone goes through to be themselves and to follow their heart towards what they really want to be doing with their life. So much of what we do is about more than just music. It’s about self-expression, autonomy, and the community you surround yourself with. Innerflight is a live free or die approach to life and also towards music. We believe in diversity, and the label reflects that musically. I want to help other artists that are also inspired by this concept.

What influenced you to start the label, and what inspires you to continue doing it?

In 2002, I moved to Berlin for four short months to see what all the fuss was about, and I was re-inspired about music. I had been going to parties in the States since the glory days of the mid 90’s. In Berlin, I experienced the same magic that was once spread across the U.S. during the 90’s, and it convinced me that it was still possible to do it again in the states on some level. Everyone who loves electronic beats deserves to feel the magic of an underground party. It’s a civil liberties issue in my opinion, a basic human right.

The people around me are the inspiration to continue on as well as all artists in the world that are following their passions.

What is happening for Innerflight in the upcoming year? What crazy parties and themed events are on the horizon?

We’ve shifted gears in a major way this year. The focus has gone from event production to music production and distribution. Our parties are not the priority anymore. We’re committed to the development of Seattle into a hotspot for electronic music, just as it was for grunge in the 90’s. There are many talented musicians in the Northwest and we want to help develop and promote them by connecting with the greater global music community.

m.0 at Tournament of Champions

m.0 at Tournament of Champions

We do love to throw parties and that will never end. However, we want our events to be a special occurrence; that’s how you keep the magic going in my opinion. In an effort to not take ourselves too seriously, we do an annual event called the Tournament of Champions. The party combines a night of sick beats with the opportunity to mash up on your friends in competitions like darts, ping-pong, and arm wrestling.

IFM covers a broad spectrum of genres. How would you describe the Innerflight sound? What theme holds all these genres together? What is the glue that connects Innerflight?

Some say, our sound is best described as “Flat Palm on Fat Booty.” Instead of a specific genre of music, we are bound together by a psychedelic spirit. Music is a “shortcut” into experiencing our collective nature, and dancing is an expression of this. We are known in the NW for having some of the best parties and dance floors around. Where everyone feels connected to each other and to the Earth through the music. By not limiting our releases to a specific genre or sound, we show another facet of what Innerflight is about: freedom of expression. Though we are bound together by spirit, we also recognize that music is a unique expression of the soul, and to limit that to certain types of machine/instrument noises and tempos would be a shame.

Innerflight proves the old adage “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts” to be true in a spiritual sense.

What music do you love to play most? What did you listen to as a kid?

I love to play music that feeds your head and shakes your ass at the same time. The line between house and techno is a gray one. As a kid, I was influenced by my older brother who turned me on to the alternative sounds of the late 80’s. By the early 90’s, I was in high school listening to grunge, industrial music, and hip hop. Things really began to change when I discovered artists like Aphex and The Orb. I went to my first party in 94′ and discovered the SF based Wicked Crew. These guys changed my musical life and showed me that it’s all about making people shake it, and the culture and lifestyle that surround that. They also taught me that as a DJ, it’s about not being afraid to mash up genres and play whatever you feel like playing.

What have been some of your favorite Innerflight shows or events?

J-Sun at Sunset Seattle

J-Sun at Sunset Seattle

My favorite event that we organize is our annual free party in Golden Gardens Park every September, called  “Sunset Seattle”.  We like to think of it as our gift to the community as well as a last opportunity for everyone to enjoy the summer weather. It’s going down again on Sunday Sept. 20th and this will be our 5th year doing the event. It seems to get better every year.

Innerflight Music is a major player in the Seattle EDM scene. To what do you attribute to your status in Seattle? How did you guys get where you are? Hard work? Hard partying? Kadeejah’s hair?

How about D, all of the above?

The Seattle EDM community is small but extremely passionate. How does Innerflight contribute to this city’s unique EDM culture?

We just do our thing, which consists of throwing parties and releasing music. Seattle has many great promoters throwing amazing events all the time, but there are very few labels actually releasing music. Hopefully our contribution is considered vital to Seattle being taken seriously on a global level.

Conversely, how has the city of Seattle, the climate and the culture contributed to the Innerflight identity?

Even though the electronic scene is small, there are a lot of party makers here in Seattle. In a lot of cities, too many cooks in the kitchen create a lot of backstabbing, but here it’s inspiring to see so many promoters working together. Of course there is an undercurrent of friendly competition, but for the most part we have all become close friends over the years. The other local promoters around us have helped shape our identity into one based on community rather than ruthless competition where the bottom line means profit. This is a very Pacific Northwest mentality and most people that come to visit find it refreshing.

Who does IFM collaborate with? Who would you like to collaborate with in the future?

We’ve collaborated to some degree with almost every promotion crew in Seattle. Local promoters: Uniting Souls, Shameless, and Sensory Effect are extended family for us, but now we are beginning to collaborate with more people internationally. Our efforts for the future are focused in this direction.

What music are you loving right now? What sounds are doing it for you? Innerflight has a lot of recent releases out- any favorites?

There always seems to be artists in every genre that I can get excited about. I’m really loving the indie tunes Matias Aguayo from Buenos Aires is putting out right now. For techno, it’s all about Spektre and on the house music tip, Jamie Jones and Thomas Schumacher are on fire. I never get tired of the Dirty Bird and Turbo labels as well.

novaTRON

novaTRON

I’d have to say that our two new releases coming out on the label this September are my favorites so far. The first is a remix EP of m.0’s classic “Lift Us Up” track that will feature new mixes from UK’s Spektre, Nerd Revolt and Mynus.  The second release is an electro single by Anglo Satellite titled “Bangin Bogus Basin”. Several remixes to choose from on this one from the likes of Will Bailey, Spenza, Titan, Pellusje, and Anglo’s alternate moniker Snowman.  We’re also expecting a new 4 track EP from Nerd Revolt this autumn as well as the highly anticipated novaTRON full length. You can purchase our music on Beatport.

They are throwing “West Coast” theme parties in Bali right now. Is Innerflight part of this West Coast Future Sound Movement? Is Seattle? How is Seattle different from all other EDM communities?

Didn’t make it to Bali, but I would imagine a “West Coast” theme party would have a So Cal motif rather than a NW. Personally, I think knit caps and old growth trees are so much sexier than board shorts and breast implants.

How is Innerflight working to bring new faces into the electronic music community?

Assos, Turkey

Assos, Turkey

We believe in our local artists and trust in their creativity to bring new sounds into the scene. Part of the focus of my travels was to discover and network with other artists and promoters in order to bring exposure on both sides.

Where do you see the Innerflight sound headed, and EDM in general? Any new fads that you think are here to stay? Any you wish would go away?

EDM is always looking for new creative sounds and so are we. There is always a new style of music coming out that draws from previous influences, but still has something new and fresh to keep people interested for a time. Then it blows up, goes commercial, and it’s onto the next cool thing.  Then again, what’s popular isn’t always what is good. We focus on what we think is good whether it’s popular at the moment or not. The best labels and music are timeless. Aren’t people bored with dubstep yet? I know I am….

How important is unity in the EDM culture? Do you think Innerflight’s multi-genre sound contributes to community cohesion? How?

Seattle promoters do their best to get along and I think we are a great example of unity within the EDM culture. I can only hope that by representing multiple genres at our parties and on our label we are helping to bring people together. I get bored when I go to a party and it’s the same style of music for 8 hours.

Which artists that you work with are super hot right now?

Novatron and Nerd Revolt are gonna blow up in the next year. Watch Out!

Tell me the truth: is novaTRON from another planet?

Sure, if you consider Shoreline another planet….

Will Innerflight be involved in the Decibel Festival in Seattle again this year? How?

Being a contributing partner in the Decibel Festival again gives us great pride. We’ll be hosting The Red Eye Afterhours event, exclusively showcasing Innerflight label artists.  The party will represent the diversity of the label and feature all live sets from Phil Western, Novatron, Nerd Revolt, & Gel Sol.

Innerflight has a thick and very loyal fan base in the Pacific Northwest. To what do you attribute that?

I’m not really sure. You’ll have to ask our audience about that one, but maybe it’s because THE DJs ARE HOT!!

Are you looking for new DJs/producers to join your crew?

I think we have enough residents, but we are always interested in expanding our label roster.

Tell me about the art car airplane, especially the “elixir bar” in the back- what kind of fun do you guys serve up under the tail?

ROCKIN

Innerflight at Burning Man

We built a 50 foot long art car in the shape of an airplane with a bangin’ sound system on one side and an elixir bar in the tail section. We made the elixir bar non-alcoholic, serving up fresh juices and baby coconuts to thirsty citizens of Black Rock City. I spent the entire summer of 2008 working on this project with an amazing crew of friends, and it all paid off in the end!

What will Innerflight be doing in five years? Where would you like to see the label? Will you stay in Seattle?

In 5 years, our label artists will be well established internationally. Seattle will have a stronger resonance on the global music radar, and Innerflight will still be rocking the local underground parties.

Free for your listening pleasure, a taster of artists from Innerflight Music:

Download Mynus’s Original Mix “Follow Me” here.

Download m.0’s “Lift Us Up” remixed by Spektre here.

Download Anglo Satellite’s “Bangin Bogus Basin” remixed by Spenza here.

***********************************************

Thank you Jason, and welcome home! Catch the Innerflight Red Eye Afterhours at the 2009 Decibel Festival in Seattle Friday, September 25 at the Electric Tea Garden featuring Phil Western, novaTRON, Nerd Revolt, Gel-Sol, Manos and Kadeejah Streets.

NEW-InnerflightBanner_24X96-WEB

More Women in the Electronic Arts: A HOW-TO GUIDE

Posted in Artists, Females in the Arts, Lists, Note to Readers with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 20, 2009 by worldromper

 

The lack of ladies behind decks and on dance floors has really been bothering me for a while; not just the dearth of women in the EDM community but music in general and indeed, arts culture as a whole. Females are globally underrepresented in the arts from San Diego to Singapore, and I wanted to figure out why.

Naha, Seattle

Naha, Seattle

People told me it was too large of an issue to tackle or have any effect on; sure, I might be able to organize a local women’s DJ night or help promote various female producers, but this giant problem encompassed all music and all arts, and there would be no solution or answer. It was too big.

I did not want a quick fix, either, like an all-female DJ night where the chicks come out spinning beats in bras; those kinds of nights draw more males than females anyway. And I didn’t just want to convince promoters to book more women DJs in the name of diversity, rather I want there to BE more talented female DJs to book. I want young girls coming up in the community to throw down, and not just as DJs, but also as producers, promoters, journalists, sound technicians, laser artists- the whole show. I want to see more women in the arts, which meant figuring out why the hell they aren’t here to begin with.

And I’ve done it. Please read on.

ill-esha, Vancouver

ill-esha, Vancouver

Some of the weak female representation in music can be surely attributed to the history of male dominance of the arts; for thousands of years men were patting male artists and musicians on the back, commissioning each other and sharing ideas while the women were raising kids and making homes from households.

Nyx, Seattle

Nyx, Seattle

Arts in the traditional female domain like folk stories and handicrafts don’t stand the test of time as well as those in male-dominated spheres. A nursery rhyme evaporates into the blur of historical haze while the Sistine Chapel will be around for a while. Though females have truly come a long baby way in regards to our gender roles, the tradition of male domination of the arts certainly still affects the dance floor on Friday night.

But that isn’t the whole story. This is 2009 and for a generation now in the Western world, women have been able to pursue any career they could possibly want, from firefighter to fine artist. So why aren’t they? Why is only one of every twenty DJs I hear playing out female? Why are dance floors almost always over 50% boys? Why can’t I remember the last time I saw a girl in a sound booth, and when they write me, why do my blog readers overwhelmingly assume that I am male?

Sasha Perera of Jahcoozi, Berlin

Sasha Perera of Jahcoozi, Berlin

Don’t women love to make and experience music and art too? Maybe they are pursuing careers that they feel are more worthwhile to society than a creative profession; now that women can be doctors and lawyers and policymakers, they are. We all know that artists are the most important people in our society; art cures ills that no doctor could, comedy can take down a dictatorship, music can change minds. Maybe women are so busy getting college degrees and starting companies that they have forgotten the true value of artistic expression; however this theory also easily applies to men. So the question remains:

WHERE THE HELL ARE THE LADIES AT?

Imagika, Los Angeles

Imagika, Los Angeles

I put this question to email lists, to forums, to strangers at clubs, to friends on the dance floor, to my mother. I clicked on every link you sent me, I checked into every female DJ or producer you said was the shit. I read and took notes on every comment about how we can get more girls out, from cleaner bathrooms to more aggressive males to less aggressive males to house music.

And I have figured out the crux of the matter; the turning point that if we can effectively change will have an enormous effect not only on the DJ booths and dance floors of the future, but on arts production in the world as a whole. Hey, I’ve got big dreams. Don’t you?

The crux of the matter, therefore, is this: CONFIDENCE.

Ana Sia, San Francisco

Ana Sia, San Francisco

Women need more confidence. After thousands and thousands of years of being told we are the lesser sex and second-class humans, we have an acute case of learned inferiority complex. We are lacking the metaphorical balls it takes to put ourselves out there but rest assured: you DON’T need literal huevos to make it as an artist in this world. But you do need confidence.

It takes a hell of a lot of guts to pull something out of your head and lay it out for the world to see and judge you on. The artists out there know this. Choosing a career in music or painting or theater is a bold and terrifying choice, a decision that requires a steadfast belief that what you have in your head is worth sharing with others- take it from someone who just relocated across the country to try and feed herself as a freelance music journalist.

Menami, Seattle

Menami, Seattle

Following an artistic path in life is a risky choice, and many women have children and will choose security over self-expression. If you have three kids to raise, are you going to go for the nursing degree or try and make it as an abstract visual artist? Yeah. I do not fault these women, not one bit, as they are doing what they deem necessary to take care of the future.

Vaccine, California

Vaccine, California

But even females without dependents are not taking the risks we should, and it is because we don’t think we are good enough. How many times have you seen a male DJ strut up to the decks like he is God’s gift to the dance floor and then proceed to take you straight to train wreck city?

Think of the female DJs that you know: a bunch of badasses, right? Outspoken, confident chicks that don’t give a shit if anyone thinks of them as are lesser human beings- because they know they are not.

Subeena, London

All women need to take a cue from these ladies, to learn confidence and make it part of ourselves. Worldwide, every one of us must come to believe that what comes out of our minds and our hands and our hearts is worth sharing. This is an epic task and a daunting challenge; one that cannot be conquered overnight. But every single one of us, male and female, can do something right now, tonight and this weekend to push females forward in the arts so that our daughters and granddaughters will be dancing to female DJs and listening to tracks produced by females half the time instead of once every blue moon.

Mary Anne Hobbs, UK

Mary Anne Hobbs, UK

Ladies, I challenge you to instill the women of the world with confidence, starting with yourselves. Men must do the same right beside us, but for females to succeed, we must unite. I once saw a female DJ walk up to the decks at an outdoor party, scheduled to play her set right after a charismatic male DJ had been just killing it. She was intimidated, and she gave up her slot- but ONLY because another female had discouraged her from playing. Had this second female instead encouraged her to play her set, bang it out, go for it- she would have. We CANNOT have this bullshit cutting down of one another. It does not make you less of a female to build another woman up; in fact, it makes you more of a human being. So step up and quit knocking down.

Each one of us can incorporate certain actions into our lives to fuel the journey of women to a greater involvement in the industry of artistic production and expression, from sharing their musical tastes as a DJ to creating giant murals to tweaking sound design and production. Females must become more confident in their artistic abilities, and if we can accomplish this, the future of humanity will be richer and more colorful for everyone.

1.    THANK FEMALE ARTISTS. Words have power. Ever gotten a compliment that made your day, or your week? As a writer, I live off the kind words of my friends; I could not write this blog without the love and support of my fellow human beings. Thank female artists always and often. Even if you are more of a glitch girl and the DJ played prog house all night, you can still thank them for getting up there and sharing. Recognize the guts it takes to perform. No need to have a colorful vocab, a simple “thank you” will do. Shy? That’s why God created Myspace and Facebook; just friend ‘em with a quick message: “Thank you for your music.” It may seem like nothing to you, too simple, a waste of space, but believe me: it is not. Please feed the animals- with your words.

2.    INVITE GIRLS TO SHOWS. Yeah yeah yeah, fear of rejection boo hoo your ego can’t take it, WHATEVER. This is an area where both males and females could really grow some balls. Weird girl in your office who smells like oranges? Invite her to Deadmau5. Neighbor chick listening to really bad pop shit? Ask her if she wants to go hear Flying Lotus. And SEATTLE- I know I have a lot of readers from the two-oh-SICK, and let me tell you: I have been asked out to electronic shows more in three months in LA than in three years in Seattle. Girls don’t bite- unless you want us to. What are you waiting for, your next life? Ladies and gentlemen, I want you to ask a girl to an electronic music show. This month. Do it.

3.    GET YOUR ASS ON THE DANCE FLOOR. Actions speak louder than words, and nothing is more encouraging to a DJ than seeing people on the dance floor getting down and having a good time. Nothing brings girls out onto the dance floor like girls on the dance floor, so get out there, ladies!

4.    TALK TO GIRLS AT SHOWS. Some people have a problem talking to strangers. I am the opposite; I have a problem NOT talking to strangers. For those of us extroverts out here, make it a little easier on the introverts by saying hello. Having a good night? This DJ rocks! Why the hell are they charging $11 for a vodka soda? Is that spit on the wall? Etc. Create a more comfortable environment for your fellow human beings. Guys, don’t be dicks. Girls, don’t be bitches. Life is better when you are nice, anyway. Figure it out.

5.    IGNORE THE HATERS. In my research for this piece, I got some pretty nasty answers back from boys regarding the reasons behind the lack of females in the EDM community, ranging from “females don’t know what good music is” to “women are dogs.” There will always be haters in the world, like the girl at the outdoor who effectively discouraged the female DJ from spinning, or the cavemen guys who still think women are dogs without souls. IGNORE THEM; they are stupid, and the boys are obviously just not getting any. Move on, and surround yourself with people who will build you up, leaving the haters behind in a slimy pool of their own negativity.

6.    FEMALE ARTISTS: STEP THE FUCK UP ALREADY. You all know the archetypal cocky DJ, right? The guy who plays everything and knows everything and IS the next big thing and DAMN anyone who thinks otherwise? God help me I LOVE these DJs, because I appreciate the absolute BALLS it takes to live like you are going to grab every dream you ever had. Having a ridiculous amount of unwavering confidence in yourself is a necessity and now is the time to go for it. DO IT, whatever IT is for you. You will never regret trying and hey- you might even succeed!

7.    WANT TO LEARN HOW TO DJ? Or produce? Or create visual art? Or run the sound? Ask someone to teach you. I have spoken to many female DJs who said they would be more than happy to teach other girls the tricks of the trade, to share the secrets and be a mentor. Who wants to be in the boys’ club when you can be in the artists’ circle?

8.   ENCOURAGE FEMALE ARTISTS. This is different than saying thank you, which in my opinion we should say to every artist every time. When your night or your life is made a little better by a female DJ or producer or promoter, tell them so, and be specific: I really liked that track with the drums, the dance floor went nuts when you dropped the dubstep, those blue lasers with the dots wicked tripped me out, I love the parties you throw because you bring a tight crowd. Encourage each other to helps create a nurturing artistic community.

9.    ALREADY INVOLVED? In the EDM community or otherwise? Are you a bad ass female DJ? Do you promote? Own a venue? Produce sick tracks? Dance? Whatever your talents, figure out something you can personally do to promote female artists and do it. Even small gestures can have an impact and you never know who you may be inspiring. I will start more heavily promoting female DJs and producers in my blog; in fact the ten pictures in this post are my ten favorite female artists in the international EDM community. Do more than you are doing right now, and make a greater effort to support women who are doing their thing in the electronic arts.

10.  AND FINALLY, BELIEVE IN YOURSELF. This is the most important item on the list. If you don’t believe in yourself, why should anybody else? Become a madly ridiculous promoter of your talents in your own mind. Talk yourself up to yourself, even if it feels stupid at first. Do whatever it takes, from tacking up pictures of inspiring females to writing positive quotes on your hand to pushing any negative thought about your abilities out of your head with nary a second of rumination. You don’t have time for that bullshit; you’ve got things to create and art to produce. SO DO IT.

If all you do is reach out to a female artist this month and say thank you on Myspace, do it. Don’t let the giant nature of this task stall you. We can do it. YOU can do it. And you have to, for the eons of women who didn’t even have the chance, and for the females of today who not fortunate enough to live in societies where they can shave their hair into a Mohawk and play minimal techno until eight in the morning. LADIES, IT IS YOUR DUTY TO CREATE, and every time you do, you inspire another female to do the same and help to insure a future full of female artists. So get crackin’.

 

Ghislain Poirier to play Broken Disco in Seattle April 17

Posted in Music News with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 11, 2009 by worldromper

Sounds like this spring is Berlin-mania for the cats of Broken Disco who have returned from an extended “fishing trip” (yeah some kind of trip) to blast back down in Seattle with some of the TIGHTEST lineups in the city- or quite possibly, THE tightest.

Drawing from four of Seattle’s most active music collectives (Decibel, Fourthcity, Sensory Effect and Shameless) and with lineups of eclectic artists from around the world espousing many electronic music genres, often at the same time, Broken Disco aims to assert Seattle’s place in the West Coast Future Sound Movement by throwing filthy fucking dance parties on a regular basis. Props!

February 20: Jona, Nutown Project, Jacob London, Broken Disconauts, Aurora Diving Club, Skyler, Dr. Mr. M, Eddie, and Mateo

March 14: D.I.M., Jerry Abstract, Anglo Satellite, PrEssHa, Recess, Levi Clark and Menami

April 17: Ghislain Poirier, Thomas Fehlmann, plus more TBA!

AND if you haven’t been to Chop Suey lately, you need to check it out again. They have added hella soundproofing so that condo-owning asshole who moved to Cap Hill and then complained about the noise can’t call the cops anymore, and the sound is better than ever! The second room remains as sweaty as hell, as it shall always be. All is right with the world; carry on.

Going Down This Week

Posted in Note to Readers with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 12, 2008 by worldromper

Your weekly rundown of Shilo-approved electronic music events.

Tuesday:

  • Mike Check, Travis Baron and Naha play some techno and hardcore at Contour. Free.
  • DnB at the Baltic- cover is a whole $3 so my broke ass is skipping it.

Wednesday:

  • Deep Wednesdays at Vito’s, house music. Free.
  • Pulse at Trinity, house music. Free.

Thursday:

  • PsyNight with Hendrik and Aaron H. at Crimson C. Free.
  • Pressha & Mike Check (and others) at free.BASS at Trinity. Free.
  • Booty Call One Year Anniversary at Contour & Awggie’s Bday, with Naha, Awggie, Pop Top & more. Free.

Friday: 

  • Balls Out for America! Polish Yer Balls! Featuring the Shameless gang and those Innerflight freaks. Recess, Menami, Kadeejah “I like to party in the car” Streets, J-Sun, Levi Clark, Manos, Night Train, and the love of my life MC Anton Bomb. Big dance party at Rebar, free apple pie, and only $5 if you are wearing red, white, and blue.
  • Botsessionz at Heavens in Pioneer Square with Sir Kutz, Aaron Simpson, Rob Noble, Sean Majors, Mike Check, Pressha, Aksion, and Jobot. Bass, breaks, and drum&bass, looks like. $7 before 11 or $10 after. Free if you are with Shilo.
  • Mad Friday night afterparties no doubt.

Saturday:

  • BASSNECTAR!!! I know it is a lame cliche but DO NOT MISS THIS SHOW. People were dancing in the streets last time. It was epic.
  • Afterparty info to be posted later